Welcome to A Short Essay on Death and Dying.

Kairos Network Blog: Stories and Essays on Death and Dying from Healthcare Professionals has picked up the story posted on Virtual Teahouse two years ago called: Douglas Firs Were Our Sanctuary. This edition is slightly edited and the collages were not able to be included. But the Andreya’s story (“A”) continues to ripple out into [...]

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I hope you enjoyed A Short Essay on Death and Dying.

I hope you enjoyed A Short Essay on Death and Dying.

No such work ever came out. Broyard's best-known story, "What the Cystoscope Said," was a harrowing account of his father's death, but his novel on the subject was put aside. The high hopes behind Mr. Mailer's praise may have been the kiss of death for an already blocked writer. Instead, a fluent, self-possessed, often cruel critic took the place of the aspiring novelist, though his prose remained as terse and trenchant as ever. "Kafka Was the Rage," an unfinished but finely honed memoir of downtown New York in 1946-47, was perhaps meant to substitute for the fiction he never wrote and the fiction others wrote about him, like Chandler Brossard's once-famous 1952 novel, "Who Walk in Darkness," which drew an unflattering portrait of him. Broyard was working on "Kafka Was the Rage" in 1989 when he learned he had prostate cancer that had already spread. In his final months -- he died in 1990 -- he turned instead to the witty, courageous essays on death and dying collected last year in "Intoxicated by My Illness." ("I make fun of my illness. I disparage it.")